Space & Innovation

Zero-Gravity Music Video from Ok Go Astonishes

Alt-rock band OK Go recently teamed up with Russian carrier S7 Airlines to film the music video for their new single Upside Down & Inside Out.

Between green screens and computer-generated graphics, Hollywood has a treasure trove of tools at its disposal to create visually stunning eye candy.

One band, however, has decided to go au naturel as far as special effects are concerned, filming their latest music video in a zero-gravity environment aboard a parabolic aircraft.

OK Go – Upside Down & Inside Out

Alt-rock band OK Go recently teamed up with Russian carrier S7 Airlines to film the music video for their new single "Upside Down & Inside Out," which was released exclusively on Facebook Thursday afternoon.

This Is The Most High Tech Music Video Ever

In a post on their website, the band explains that, although months of planning and weeks of practice were required for the shoot, the video was shot in a single take. Some footage, however, was edited out to make the weightlessness appear continuous, as the parabolic aircraft used during filming can only achieve weightlessness for 27-second periods and requires a five-minutes "reset" period between rounds.

"Because we wanted the video to be a single, uninterrupted routine, we shot continuously over the course of 8 consecutive weightless periods, which took about 45 minutes, total," the band writes.

"We paused our actions, and the music, during the non-weightless periods, and then cut out these sections and smoothed over each transition with a morph."

Band Creates Animated Magic Eye Music Video

The rockers also note that zero-gravity environments aren't for the faint of heart. Over 21 different flights, there were nearly 60 "puke events" amongst the cast and crew.

"Luckily, this was a group of very committed adventurers, so we all soldiered through and eventually got accustomed to the crazy sensations," the band adds.

This article originally appeared on DSCVRD; all rights reserved.

German photographer Martin Klimas' latest exhibition, a series of images he calls "Sonic Sculptures," is so explosive and colorful, it just may change the way you look -- yes, look -- at music.

For the project, Klimas put vibrantly colored paint on a diaphragm over a speaker, turned up the volume on selected music and snapped photos of what the New York Times Magazine described as "a 3-D take on Jackson Pollack."

"I use an ordinary speaker with a funnel-shaped protective membrane on top of it," he told the Smithsonian. "I pour paint colors onto the rubber membrane, and then I withdraw from the setup."

The above photo shows Prince's "Sign 'O' The Times."

Klimas' project was inspired by the research of Hans Jenny, a German physician, scientist and father of cymatics, which is the study of wave phenomena. Jenny photographed his experiments of the effects sound vibrations had on various materials such as fluids, powders and liquid paste. Jenny placed these substances on a rubber drum head and, as it vibrated, he found different tones produced different patterns in the materials. Low tones made powders assemble in straight lines, while deeper tones made for more complex patterns.

The above photo reflects Phillip Glass' "Music With Changing Parts."

Klimas used a variety of music -- everyone from Prince to James Brown and Charlie Parker to Phillip Glass. He says he leaves the "creation of the picture to the sound itself" and, after cranking the volume, steps back. Once the paint starts jumping, a sound-trigger device that detects noise spikes automatically takes photos.

"I mostly selected works that were particularly dynamic, and percussive," Klimas said. Though he used songs from a variety of music styles and eras, many of the tracks chosen were by musicians who had ties to the visual art world, such as the Velvet Underground and John Cage.

Before they struck gold with "Get Lucky," Daft Punk got dance floors thumping with "Around the World" shown here.

Klimas spent six months completing the project in his Dusseldorf studio and took about 1,000 shots to get his final 212 images. He went through 18.5 gallons of paint, on average of 6 ounces per shot, and blew two speakers while cranking the tunes. He used a Hasselblad camera with a shutter speed of 1/7000th a second.

The above image is a photo of Ornette Coleman's "Free Jazz, A Collective Improvisation."

Blown speakers and exactitudes aside, Klimas said "the most annoying thing was cleaning up the set thoroughly after every single shot." Check out more of Klimas' work on his website (www.martin-klimas.de), or better yet, if you're in New York City, stop by the Foley Gallery on the Lower East Side. There you can find his new exhibition, "SONIC," which opened earlier this month.

The above photo illustrates Pink Floyd's "On the Run."