What's The Difference Between Jet Fuel and Car Fuel?

Jet fuel and car fuel both come from crude oil, but you definitely can't put jet fuel in your car to make it go faster. Why not?

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When Diesel Won't Do, Toyota Uses Jet Fuel (Wired)
"A funny thing happens when diesel fuel drops below -30 degrees Fahrenheit: It turns to jelly. So when Icelandic 4×4 conversion specialists Arctic Trucks began prepping a fleet of Toyota Hilux pickups for the longest polar expedition in history, they had to find a new fuel source to cope with the frigid climes." 

What's the Difference Between Gasoline, Kerosene, Diesel, etc.? (How Stuff Works)
"The 'crude oil' pumped out­ of the ground is a black liquid called petroleum. This liquid contains aliphatic hydrocarbons, or hydrocarbons composed of nothing­ but hydrogen and carbon. The carbon atoms link together in chains of different lengths. It turns out that hydrocarbon molecules of different lengths have different properties and behaviors."

Kerosene and Gasoline Flash Point (Stanford)
"When examining the difference between the fuels used to power a car versus a plane, it is critical to analyze the fundamental difference in their flash point. The question of "can I put jet fuel in my car to make it run incredibly fast?" seems somewhat entertaining on the surface level, but is shot down immediately by simple aspects of how the respective engines are built to run. Jet engines work fundamentally different than piston engines, and therefore their fuel requirements are drastically different."