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World's Largest Salt Flat: Photos

During the rainy season, which lasts from January to April, the world's largest salt flat turns into the world's largest mirror.

During the rainy season, which lasts from January to April, the world's largest salt flat -- Salar de Uyuni, in Bolivia -- turns into the world's largest mirror, reflecting heaven on Earth. Here a 4x4 car drives across the desert.

The rare cacti (Echinopsis tarijensis) sit in profile on Isla Inkahuasi with star trails in the sky during a long night exposure.

A rock formation, better known as the Stone Tree, lies in the middle of the Siloli desert and volcanic region of Potosi in southwestern Bolivia, on the Andes mountain range, near the Chilean border.

Tours are headed by guides who traverse the region without any roads to access geographic areas, such as lagoons, salt mines, rock formations and volcanoes. The region is known for its unpredictable climate and temperature changes, often providing snow in a small 1 kilometer area.

Reflection of Tunupa volcano and four-wheels drive trek across Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia.

Laguna Colorada at the Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve, with James' flamingos. The salt lake contains borax islands, whose white color contrasts with the reddish color of its waters, which is caused by red sediments and pigmentation of some algae.

A hotel in the southwest Bolivian desert. Elevation is 3,653 meters (nearly 12,000 feet).

During the rainy season, Salar De Uyuni becomes saturated with over several centimeters water.

Salt workers break up the surface salts for collection.

At sunset, the salt sits in mounds to dry.

Floating crystals of salt.

Crystals of salt.

Salt Workers Feet

Cacti on Isla de los Pescadores in the Salar de Uyuni salt flats.

Salar de Uyuni salt flats.

Flamingoes on salt flats.