Mayan City Remains Found in Forest: Photos

Pyramidal structures, palace remains, ballgame courts, plazas and sculpted monuments have been uncovered in the Mexican jungle.

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Pyramidal structures, palace remains, ballgame courts, plazas and sculpted monuments have been uncovered in the Mexican jungle, revealing one the largest sites in the Central Maya Lowlands.

According to archaeologist Ivan Sprajc, the previously unknown Maya city covers more than 54 acres in the southeastern state of Campeche. Its vast size suggests the city was a seat of government between 600 and 900 A.D.

Consisting of three monumental complexes standing in the west, southeast and northeast, the site holds the remains of buildings, plazas and pyramidal structures, with the tallest one measuring more than 75 feet. Several stelae (tall sculpted stone shafts) were also found.

Associated with the stelae, several altars -- low circular stones -- were unearthed.

The archaeologists named the city Chactún, meaning "Red Stone" or "Great Stone," after one of the 19 stelae recovered so far. The inscription says that the ruler K'inich B’'ahlam "erected the Red Stone (or Great Stone ) in 751."