Ever heard a recording of yourself and hated the way you sound? It's a common thing, and has to do with sound vibration...or the lack thereof. Trace describes what we actually sound like when we speak, plus why we may be drawn to the sounds of others.


Read More:

"Why Did Old-Time Announcers Talk That Way?"
news.discovery.com/history/us-history/old-time-baseball-players-talk-130404.htm
"American commentators and former baseball players Pee Wee Reese and Dizzy Dean, along with an unidentified man, broadcast the CBS "Game of the Week," around 1960."

"1860 'Phonautograph' Is Earliest Known Recording"
npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89380697
"Audio historians have found a sound recording that predates Edison's phonograph by nearly 20 years."

"Language Mystery: When Did Americans Stop Sounding This Way?"
theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/08/language-mystery-when-did-americans-stop-sounding-this-way/243326
"The Atlantic's wonderful new Video Channel has a lot of great material, and it is invidious to point to any one offering rather than another."

"Why you hate the sound of your own voice"
bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/02/17557410-why-you-hate-the-sound-of-your-own-voice
"Sound can enter our ears in one of two ways: air-conducted or bone-conducted."


DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week.

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