Titanosaur, the newest dinosaur on display at the American Museum of Natural History, is so large that it doesn’t even fit into the museum’s exhibit space.

Instead, the head of the massive creature’s 122-foot skeleton extends out into the museum’s elevator banks as a friendly welcome to visitors who are about to see one of the largest dinosaurs to have ever roamed the Earth.

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An herbivorous giant, this particular titanosaur roamed what is now Patagonia approximately 100 million years ago, researchers believe. It was unearthed in Argentina in 2014 — so recently, in fact, that paleontologists have yet to formally name the species.

In the meantime, it is known generically as Argentinosaurus or Titanosaur, after its final resting place and expected scientific classification, respectively.

The display at the American Museum of Natural History doesn’t include any of the actual fossils from Argentina, which museum officials say are “far too heavy to mount” — a valid excuse, considering that the dinosaur was believed to weigh 70 tons.

Paleontologists instead made 3-D scans of the original fossils, which were then used to print significantly lighter fiberglass models of the gargantuan creature’s skeleton.

Article first appeared on Discovery's blog Dscovrd.